Last edited by Nem
Monday, July 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of confiscation of property during the Civil War found in the catalog.

confiscation of property during the Civil War

J. G. Randall

confiscation of property during the Civil War

by J. G. Randall

  • 158 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Mutual Printing and Lithographing Co. in Indianapolis .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Finance, commerce, confiscations, etc

    • Edition Notes

      Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Chicago, 1911.

      Statementby James Garfield Randall.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE480 .R18
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvi, 7-72 p.
      Number of Pages72
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6559380M
      LC Control Number13017132
      OCLC/WorldCa5636851

      Atlantic region during the American Revolution, the confiscation of property, and the question of loyalist reintegration in the years following the civil war in North America. Historians have long explored the question of loyalist flight and exile, and this dissertation explores an additional problem of .   In his book Houses of Civil War America, Hugh Howard writes that the mansion served many purposes during the war: It was the headquarters for General George McClellan; its property .

      The Limits of Sovereignty: Property Confiscation in the Union and the Confederacy during the Civil War. By Daniel W. Hamilton. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, viii, pp. $ CONFISCATION OF PROPERTY. CONFISCATION OF PROPERTY has occurred in the United States during wartime, ever since the revolutionary war. As a means of financing hostilities against England, the Continental Congress declared in that the property of Loyalists was subject to seizure. By the end of , every state had passed a confiscation act, and Loyalists had lost property worth millions.

      Most of the confiscated property was purchased by existing landowners, and consequently the confiscation policy produced little change in wealth patterns. The Union was markedly reluctant to press confiscation of property owned by Confederates during the Civil War and Reconstruction, and seemingly rejected confiscation as an appropriate policy.   During the Civil War, the U.S. Congress passed two “Confiscation Acts” relating to the fate of slaves that made their way to Union lines. The Confiscation Act of , signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on August 6, , authorized the confiscation of any Confederate property by Union forces (“property” included slaves).. The Confiscation Act of , passed on J


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Confiscation of property during the Civil War by J. G. Randall Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Confiscation of Property During the Civil War: A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Arts and Literature; In Candidacy Department of History (Classic Reprint): Randall, James Garfield: : Books. Flip to back Flip to : James Garfield Randall. Daniel W.

Hamilton locates that change in the crucible of the Civil War. In the early days of the war, Congress passed the First and Second Confiscation Acts, authorizing the Union to seize private confiscation of property during the Civil War book in the rebellious states of the Confederacy, and the Confederate Congress responded with the broader Sequestration by: 9.

textsThe confiscation of property during the Civil War. Evidence reported by bqal for item propertycivilwar00randrich on Nov 3, ; visible notice of copyright and date; stated date is ; not published by the US government; Have not checked for Pages: confiscation during the Civil War.

The important, though unde veloped, subject of rebel sequestration, for instance, has been referred to only incidentally as throwing light on the motives for the Union measures of forfeiture.

A unique class of "property". The debate over the rules of war was, nonetheless, for it explains how both civilians and military viewed the right to seize private property during the Civil War.

This debate is central to understanding why the confiscation acts failed to realize the goals of their supporters. When the Civil War began, the Union. Randall and Ruth Painter Randall Papers (bulk ) MSS Randall, J.

(James Garfield), Randall, Ruth Pain items containers linear feet Collection material in English Manuscript Division Library of Congress. From Property to Person, by Silvana R. Siddali, is one of the few close examinations of Federal confiscation legislation during the Civil this reason alone, it is of scholarly interest.

Though the laws called for sweeping expropriation of Confederates' slaves and property, the author contends they were “complicated, vague, and so softened” by congressional committees that they were.

The Confiscation Acts () weredesigned to sanction slave holding states by authorizing the Federal Government to seize rebel properties (including land and other assets held in Northern and border states)and grant freedom to slaves who fought with or worked forthe Confederate m Lincoln objected to the Acts for fear they mightpush border states, particularly.

Similarly, forfeiture laws arise most strongly during perceived crises, which cause the public to be persuaded of the necessity for drastic measures to combat an "enemy," real or imagined.

The Confiscation Act of Jpassed during the Civil War, authorized in rem procedures against the property of Southern rebels and their sympathizers.

Confiscation Acts, (–64), in U.S. history, series of laws passed by the federal government during the American Civil War that were designed to liberate slaves in the seceded states.

The first Confiscation Act, passed on Aug. 6,authorized Union seizure of. Confiscation of property during the Civil War. Indianapolis, Mutual Printing and Lithographing Co., (OCoLC) Material Type: Thesis/dissertation: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: J G Randall; Frank and Virginia Williams Collection of Lincolniana (Mississippi State University.

Libraries). Civil forfeiture in the United States, also called civil asset forfeiture or civil judicial forfeiture, is a process in which law enforcement officers take assets from persons suspected of involvement with crime or illegal activity without necessarily charging the owners with wrongdoing.

While civil procedure, as opposed to criminal procedure, generally involves a dispute between two private. Daniel W. Hamilton locates that change in the crucible of the Civil War.

In the early days of the war, Congress passed the First and Second Confiscation Acts, authorizing the Union to seize private property in the rebellious states of the Confederacy, and the Confederate Congress responded with the broader Sequestration Act. A well written concise consideration of an important feature of the Civil War—first, the confiscation of enemy property by the Union sovereignty, and second, that of the so-called Confederacy during the Civil War An excellent introduction into one of the lesser known but signmificant legal aspects of the war."Author: Daniel W.

Hamilton. Property within republican thought is not “owned” in an absolute sense but is provisionally granted as a “bundle of rights,” or a set of malleable prohibitions and entitlements determined entirely within the political process. Property rights thus are relational and are functions of social policy rather than the revelation of reason, natural law, or divine will.

During the American. This book locates that change in the crucible of the Civil War. In the early days of the war, Congress passed the First and Second Confiscation Acts, authorizing the Union to seize private property in the rebellious states of the Confederacy, and the Confederate Congress responded with the broader Sequestration Act.

The Limits of Sovereignty: Property Confiscation in the Union and the Confederacy during the Civil Daniel W. Hamilton.

(Chicago: University of Chicago Press, viii, pp. $, ISBN. During the Civil War, both the Union Congress and the Confederate Congress put in place sweeping confiscation programs designed to seize the private property of enemy citizens on a massive scale. In the first summer of the Civil War, in the wake of the Battle of Bull Run, the Union Congress in August quickly passed the First Confiscation Act.

This book is the first full account in more than 20 years of two significant, but relatively understudied, laws passed during the Civil War. The Confiscation Acts () were designed to sanction slave holding states by authorizing the Federal Government to seize rebel properties (including land and other assets held in Northern and border states) and grant freedom to slaves who fought with.

What Liberals Don’t Understand: A Serious Attempt at Gun Confiscation Could Lead to Civil War By John Hawkins PM EST Share Tweet Email Comments. During the Civil War, both the Federal Government and the Confederate States government compiled records relating to Southern civilians, or Confederate citizens.

On March 3,the United States War relating to the confiscation of property from citizens of Alexandria, Fairfax, and Loudon counties who. During the Civil War’s first important battle at First Bull Run in JulyUnion observers saw thousands of slaves doing supportive work for the Confederate army.

Since the Union force was defeated at the battle, Northerners concluded that they were not going to end the war as quickly as previously supposed. Consequently, a property.

During the war a remarkably demanding property confiscation regime was imposed on a mostly willing citizenry by the Confederate courts. The relatively sudden r eassertion of broad power over individual property in the Confederacy was at odds with dominant Southern constitutional thought before the Civil War.